Something for my conservative Catholic friends

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Anarcho-Ichthus-favSome of us Catholic libertarians come from a conservative political background. We understand the dilemma to which Catholic Republicans have become accustomed in recent decades. It seems like the choice is between electing either 1) lying Republicans who quickly disappoint or 2) lying Democrats whose very promises are an affront.

Confession1With that in mind, I invite you to check out, this article by my friend Mark Cavaliere: “Confession of a Catholic Libertarian.” Mark is the administrator of the Catholic Libertarians Facebook page.

Mark’s road will be very familiar to many. For all who are beginning to doubt whether the right guys are ever going to get control of the mess that the government has become, read Mark’s Confession and then look into liberty. Find out how Catholic it really is.

To begin exploring Catholicism and Liberty, go to Getting Started: Catholicism and libertarianism

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Libertarian Jesus

Freedom Feens – Why be libertarian?

microphoneFreedom Feens is a daily, liberty-related radio show with Michael W. Dean and a rotating cast of co-hosts.

Freedom Feen Hugo González and I co-hosted Thursday’s show. The 2-hour show is broadcast live at LRN.FM weeknights at Midnight Central time and at noon on weekends.

Show notes for 06/11/2015:

Occupational licencing — Porcfest 2015 — Do libertarians approve of vices?  — Why people come to libertarianism — Make an AR-15 at home with Ghost Gunner

Download or listen to today’s show here:

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I will be with the Freedom Feens broadcasting live from the Porcupine Freedom Festival in Lancaster, N.H. during the week of July 21-27, 2015, beginning at midnight Sunday night (CST).

Or visit Freedom Feens

Freedom Feens – Obeying the State? Not so fast!

unjust-lawFreedom Feens is a daily, liberty-related radio show with Michael W. Dean and a rotating cast of co-hosts.

I recently co-hosted the Feens broadcast with Diana Keiler and Ben Stone (the Bad Quaker). The 2-hour show is broadcast live at LRN.FM weeknights at Midnight Central time and at noon on weekends. A list of stations carrying the Freedom Feens is available here

Show notes for 05/03/2015:  Libertarianism and the non-aggression principle The State: Doing evil that good may result Romans 13: Obey the government? How St Paul dishonored and mocked the Emperor Nero — Paying taxes: Render to Caesar — “Slaves, Obey your masters” — Natural disasters: Private aid trumps government assistance — Lawyer advertising

Download or listen to today’s show here:

[Download here] (right click, then Save link as . . .)

Or visit Freedom Feens

Necessary evil

When St. Paul Tweaked the Emperor’s Nose

Christian statists like to drag out St. Paul’s epistle to the Romans to demonstrate that disobedience to government is not an option:

st paul“Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God. Therefore he who resists the authorities resists what God has appointed, and those who resist will incur judgment.

For rulers are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad. Would you have no fear of him who is in authority? Then do what is good, and you will receive his approval, for he is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain.”  Rom. 13:1-4

Some laws must be disobeyed

Long recognized, however, are certain exceptions to this “always obey the government” rule. While St. Paul here equates obedience with “doing what is good,” no one argues that governments have ever confined their conduct to what is good. We find the famous standoff recorded in the Acts of the Apostles where St. Peter and the apostles defy the rulers saying: “We must obey God rather than men.” Acts 5:29. Numerous other approving recitations of civil disobedience occur in both the Old and New Testaments.

Some must always (and everywhere) be obeyed

So first of all, we must disobey some laws, but even the government gets many laws right. This second sort of law are those that seek to prevent or correct harm to others; such prohibitions would have to be obeyed in any society.

Unjust Nanny-state Laws

Finally, alongside the protective laws (which must be obeyed) and the laws which command us to do evil (which must be disobeyed) we still have that great morass of laws designed either 1) to steal from us; or 2) punish us unless we conduct our own lives according to the ruler’s demands.

It may well be wise to obey this third sort of law (if only out of self-defense), but as to any Christian moral obligation to obey, a closer look at St Paul’s epistle to the Romans suggests another layer to the analysis and raises the question as what duty—if any—is owed to the authorities:

For the same reason you also pay taxes, for the authorities are ministers of God, attending to this very thing. Pay all of them their dues, taxes to whom taxes are due, revenue to whom revenue is due, respect to whom respect is due, honor to whom honor is due. Rom.13:6-7.

How much honor is due?

The rulers might read this passage as satisfying homage, but the subversive undercurrent of this verse is barely beneath the surface for any objective reader. Indeed, justice might cry out that no taxes are due; that the bloody hands of the ruler merit no respect; and his thefts deserve not honor but punishment. Only a fool feels honored at having been wished “all the respect he is due.” St. Paul’s words are reminiscent of Bilbo’s speech at his birthday party:

I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.

~ J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings.

It’s hard to make out whether he is insulting or paying a compliment.

As with so much of scripture, the writings of St. Paul are rich with multiple levels of meaning. It turns out that the stern apostle possessed a perilous sense of humor, quite capable of lampooning the king.

Nero runs his race

In the year 66 A.D., the Emperor Nero left Rome to compete in the Olympic games and make a concert tour of Greece. At Olympia, he competed in the four-horse chariot race. The historian Suetonius, in The Twelve Caesars, reported that Nero drove his chariot with at least 10 horses. The emperor was thrown from his chariot during the race and had to be picked up and put back at the reins.

The emperor was unable to remain in his seat and gave up the race before the finish. Since he was the emperor, the judges crowned him the winner anyway. Nero generously declared the whole province a free country and gave the judges large sums of money.

This humiliation would have been fresh news when the buffoonish emperor returned to Rome and soon afterward had the apostle Paul beheaded. Could there be a connection between Nero’s race and a letter St Paul penned from a prison cell in Rome? The apostle wrote this in his last letter to his young friend Timothy,:

An athlete is not crowned unless he competes according to the rules. . . . [T]he time of my departure has come. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that Day.  2 Tim. 2:5, 4:6-8.

Nero the athlete had also competed, but he never finished the race. Nero did not compete according to the rules, yet was awarded the crown. Can there be any doubt that St Paul combined his bittersweet farewell to Timothy with a joke at Nero’s expense? If Nero was due respect simply for being the emperor–as Romans 13 is so often read–then St. Paul failed to follow his own rule. It is something to ponder when we consider one’s duty to any ruler or government.

disobedience700

Read the related post: “Does the Bible Approve of Violent Government” here.

Jury Nullification – The power to do what is right.

notguiltySometimes I post an article in my criminal law blog that is of interest to libertarians. Here is my three-part article on taking some considerable power back from the state:

Jury Nullification – The power to do what is right: Part I, Part II, Part III 

Wretched hive

How can a pro-life Catholic be a libertarian?

Catholic Libertarians  XmasMore and more, American Catholics are coming to understand the essential compatibility between Catholicism and libertarianism. The great virtue of libertarianism is the respect it accords one’s neighbor.

As we are told in the book of Tobit 4:15: “Do to no one what you yourself dislike,” a command we recognize as a corollary to the Golden rule. This makes libertarianism the one political philosophy that truly takes human dignity and free will seriously.

At the same time, some Catholics see the liberty movement as a threat to both the Church and society. Until recently, opposition to libertarianism in both Catholic and secular media has been sporadic, but now we are seeing a rising protest. Last June, there was the much publicized conference touting “The Catholic Case Against Libertarianism,” most of it springing from a Catholic left perspective. Certainly most of the noise seems to be coming from the left or redistribution side of the fence.

A recent article at Crux by Robert G. Christian, however, comes from a fresh direction. In If you are pro-life, you can’t be a libertarian,” he writes:

“We believe that every single human being has a fundamental right to life. This human right is innate and immutable. Directly and intentionally taking an innocent life is always immoral and indefensible.”

That is solid Church teaching that any Catholic must accept, but the article quickly moves onto shaky ground. As critics of libertarianism inevitably do, the article starts in by mischaracterizing libertarians as something most of us are not:

“Libertarianism is centered on a commitment to the autonomy of the individual and removing impediments to the individual’s freedom of action.”

“A good way to strengthen the pro-choice side is by framing the debate around autonomy, individual choice, and self-interest.”

The coming arguments could all follow smoothly except that most libertarians, especially Catholic libertarians, would never frame the debate around “autonomy, individual choice and self-interest.”

It is true that libertarianism respects free will and would allow freedom of action so long as it does not harm other people, but individualism is not its essence. The bottom line of libertarianism is the nonaggression principle–which simply stated–means that one may not initiate physical force against another. That’s it. Period.

biil&joeThe Church teaches love of neighbor as a core belief. The Catholic libertarian embraces that duty without reservation. Indeed, he believes more strongly in such duties because he knows those duties are his own, not the job of some distant government that has nothing of its own to offer and gives only what it has first stolen.

The article’s main theme is that the pro-life movement must use every tool possible to protect life:

“If the pro-life movement wants to succeed, it should embrace a comprehensive approach to abortion that recognizes the full range of duties that individual people, intermediary institutions, and the government have in supporting pregnant women, strengthening families, and protecting lives.”

While Mr. Christian may be surprised by this, pro-life libertarians would agree with everything in that paragraph, including the role of some “government” or other institution in protecting the public from harm. Since prohibiting abortion and punishing it are preventive and responsive force (not an initiation of force), no libertarian who believed an unborn child has a right to life would have a problem with such laws.

This is not to argue that libertarianism resolves the pro-choice/pro-life conflict, but neither does our current system. There is no disputing that the U.S. Government alone is the sole entity preventing the prohibition of abortion in many U.S. states, including my own. On this issue, the United States is an enemy of life and there is little prospect of overcoming it.

Even so, the article decries libertarian “anti-government rhetoric.” Mr.Christian views government as a pro-life ally, if only we can gain control of it. This is a fool’s errand. We should ask if such help seems imminent. Better progress might be made by getting the police state boots off our necks. There is a certain irony in the argument that an incorrigibly aggressive state is an essential tool for fixing the problem of violence against the most helpless.

It may be true that if the state were truly determined to end abortion, then a completely totalitarian state would be most effective in sniffing out more abortions: watching everyone minutely, and punishing everyone most vigorously. Most people, however, would find the good done by such a police state far would be outweighed by the evils it fostered.

The reality, however, is that our police state does not prohibit abortion and—adding insult to injury—it uses its power to protect and fund abortion; and makes all of us partners in its crimes.

Most Catholic libertarians agree that abortion must be outlawed, just as any crime against an innocent human being—whether it be murder, rape or assault—must also be outlawed. Admittedly, criminalization will have only limited effectiveness. The way that decentralized communities would deal with the offense of abortion will undoubtedly vary, but the practice must not be permitted.

The higher priority, however, must be the task of changing minds to value the life of both mother and child. A voluntary society—one that respects others and removes barriers to adoption—is our best hope.

At the beginning of this post, I noted that most criticism of Catholic libertarians has come from the Catholic economic left who fear libertarianism would hinder the growth of the welfare state. I gave Mr. Christian credit for taking a different tack in the war on Catholic libertarians—not because there is any conflict in being both pro-life and libertarian—but because I appreciate pro-life allies of every stripe.

Even so, he eventually reverts to a pitch for the welfare state (“economic justice”) as necessary for reducing abortion. He calls the free market a “grave threat to unborn life” and argues:

“Only by fixing and strengthening the social safety net, supporting pregnant women to ensure their needs are met, developing pro-family policies, and increasing economic opportunity and mobility for those living in poverty can we minimize abortion. This demands robust government action, something that cannot be reconciled with libertarianism.”

We libertarians gladly join in a call for government action. We propose that government repeal the thousands of state-created impediments to human flourishing, each of which separates people from good jobs, independent housing and the ability to create their own businesses. See “Catholic Libertarians in the Critics Den, A Response.”  These are the sorts of changes that foster human dignity.

There is good reason to doubt the ability of an aggression-based government to protect those who have no voice. Only a society based on respect for life and freedom can protect the unborn, for such respect comes from an impulse that is both Catholic and libertarian: Love your neighbor as yourself. Never do to others what you would not want done to you.

To succeed in this, we need only to recognize Jesus in everyone we meet, even if they are not yet born.