Freedom Toons – Catholic and Libertarian

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Seamus Coughlin is a Catholic libertarian cartoonist. Below is his video, “What Libertarians Actually Believe: Stereotypes.” For more from this talented guy, head over to his website, Freedom Toons.

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Midwest Peace & Liberty Fest – this weekend

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Randy at Runge squareI’m excited to be going to The 3rd Annual Midwest Peace & Liberty Fest to held this coming weekend on August 7-10, 2015 at the Circle Pines Center in Delton, Michigan (about 2+ hours NW of Chicago).

If any readers will be going, let me know. I’d would enjoy meeting. Randy England

For information, go to The 3rd Annual Midwest Peace & Liberty Fest.

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Freedom Feens – Doing Civil Disobedience

Anarcho-Ichthus-favFreedom Feens is a daily, liberty-related radio show with Michael W. Dean and a rotating cast of co-hosts.

Ben Stone (the Bad Quaker) and I co-hosted Sunday’s show. The 2-hour show is broadcast live at LRN.FM weeknights at Midnight Central time and at noon on weekends.

Show notes for 07/19/2015:

The Outlines of Civil Disobedience — The Limits of Civil Obedience — Breaking the Seal of the Confessional  —  PorcFest South?

Civil Disobedience

Download or listen to today’s show here:

[Download here] (right click, then Save link as . . .)

Or visit Freedom Feens

Something for my conservative Catholic friends

Anarcho-Ichthus-favSome of us Catholic libertarians come from a conservative political background. We understand the dilemma to which Catholic Republicans have become accustomed in recent decades. It seems like the choice is between electing either 1) lying Republicans who quickly disappoint or 2) lying Democrats whose very promises are an affront.

Confession1With that in mind, I invite you to check out, this article by my friend Mark Cavaliere: “Confession of a Catholic Libertarian.” Mark is the administrator of the Catholic Libertarians Facebook page.

Mark’s road will be very familiar to many. For all who are beginning to doubt whether the right guys are ever going to get control of the mess that the government has become, read Mark’s Confession and then look into liberty. Find out how Catholic it really is.

To begin exploring Catholicism and Liberty, go to Getting Started: Catholicism and libertarianism

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Libertarian Jesus

Freedom Feens – Why be libertarian?

microphoneFreedom Feens is a daily, liberty-related radio show with Michael W. Dean and a rotating cast of co-hosts.

Freedom Feen Hugo González and I co-hosted Thursday’s show. The 2-hour show is broadcast live at LRN.FM weeknights at Midnight Central time and at noon on weekends.

Show notes for 06/11/2015:

Occupational licencing — Porcfest 2015 — Do libertarians approve of vices?  — Why people come to libertarianism — Make an AR-15 at home with Ghost Gunner

Download or listen to today’s show here:

[Download here] (right click, then Save link as . . .)

I will be with the Freedom Feens broadcasting live from the Porcupine Freedom Festival in Lancaster, N.H. during the week of July 21-27, 2015, beginning at midnight Sunday night (CST).

Or visit Freedom Feens

Freedom Feens – Obeying the State? Not so fast!

unjust-lawFreedom Feens is a daily, liberty-related radio show with Michael W. Dean and a rotating cast of co-hosts.

I recently co-hosted the Feens broadcast with Diana Keiler and Ben Stone (the Bad Quaker). The 2-hour show is broadcast live at LRN.FM weeknights at Midnight Central time and at noon on weekends. A list of stations carrying the Freedom Feens is available here

Show notes for 05/03/2015:  Libertarianism and the non-aggression principle The State: Doing evil that good may result Romans 13: Obey the government? How St Paul dishonored and mocked the Emperor Nero — Paying taxes: Render to Caesar — “Slaves, Obey your masters” — Natural disasters: Private aid trumps government assistance — Lawyer advertising

Download or listen to today’s show here:

[Download here] (right click, then Save link as . . .)

Or visit Freedom Feens

Necessary evil

When St. Paul Tweaked the Emperor’s Nose

Christian statists like to drag out St. Paul’s epistle to the Romans to demonstrate that disobedience to government is not an option:

st paul“Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God. Therefore he who resists the authorities resists what God has appointed, and those who resist will incur judgment.

For rulers are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad. Would you have no fear of him who is in authority? Then do what is good, and you will receive his approval, for he is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain.”  Rom. 13:1-4

Some laws must be disobeyed

Long recognized, however, are certain exceptions to this “always obey the government” rule. While St. Paul here equates obedience with “doing what is good,” no one argues that governments have ever confined their conduct to what is good. We find the famous standoff recorded in the Acts of the Apostles where St. Peter and the apostles defy the rulers saying: “We must obey God rather than men.” Acts 5:29. Numerous other approving recitations of civil disobedience occur in both the Old and New Testaments.

Some must always (and everywhere) be obeyed

So first of all, we must disobey some laws, but even the government gets many laws right. This second sort of law are those that seek to prevent or correct harm to others; such prohibitions would have to be obeyed in any society.

Unjust Nanny-state Laws

Finally, alongside the protective laws (which must be obeyed) and the laws which command us to do evil (which must be disobeyed) we still have that great morass of laws designed either 1) to steal from us; or 2) punish us unless we conduct our own lives according to the ruler’s demands.

It may well be wise to obey this third sort of law (if only out of self-defense), but as to any Christian moral obligation to obey, a closer look at St Paul’s epistle to the Romans suggests another layer to the analysis and raises the question as what duty—if any—is owed to the authorities:

For the same reason you also pay taxes, for the authorities are ministers of God, attending to this very thing. Pay all of them their dues, taxes to whom taxes are due, revenue to whom revenue is due, respect to whom respect is due, honor to whom honor is due. Rom.13:6-7.

How much honor is due?

The rulers might read this passage as satisfying homage, but the subversive undercurrent of this verse is barely beneath the surface for any objective reader. Indeed, justice might cry out that no taxes are due; that the bloody hands of the ruler merit no respect; and his thefts deserve not honor but punishment. Only a fool feels honored at having been wished “all the respect he is due.” St. Paul’s words are reminiscent of Bilbo’s speech at his birthday party:

I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.

~ J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings.

It’s hard to make out whether he is insulting or paying a compliment.

As with so much of scripture, the writings of St. Paul are rich with multiple levels of meaning. It turns out that the stern apostle possessed a perilous sense of humor, quite capable of lampooning the king.

Nero runs his race

In the year 66 A.D., the Emperor Nero left Rome to compete in the Olympic games and make a concert tour of Greece. At Olympia, he competed in the four-horse chariot race. The historian Suetonius, in The Twelve Caesars, reported that Nero drove his chariot with at least 10 horses. The emperor was thrown from his chariot during the race and had to be picked up and put back at the reins.

The emperor was unable to remain in his seat and gave up the race before the finish. Since he was the emperor, the judges crowned him the winner anyway. Nero generously declared the whole province a free country and gave the judges large sums of money.

This humiliation would have been fresh news when the buffoonish emperor returned to Rome and soon afterward had the apostle Paul beheaded. Could there be a connection between Nero’s race and a letter St Paul penned from a prison cell in Rome? The apostle wrote this in his last letter to his young friend Timothy,:

An athlete is not crowned unless he competes according to the rules. . . . [T]he time of my departure has come. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that Day.  2 Tim. 2:5, 4:6-8.

Nero the athlete had also competed, but he never finished the race. Nero did not compete according to the rules, yet was awarded the crown. Can there be any doubt that St Paul combined his bittersweet farewell to Timothy with a joke at Nero’s expense? If Nero was due respect simply for being the emperor–as Romans 13 is so often read–then St. Paul failed to follow his own rule. It is something to ponder when we consider one’s duty to any ruler or government.

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Read the related post: “Does the Bible Approve of Violent Government” here.